Home > Peru 2017 > Peru – September 14, 2017

Peru – September 14, 2017

Thursday, September 14, 2017

Maria picks us up in the morning to take us to the Cusco airport for our flight back to Lima. The checkin seemed to take a long time, but we zipped through security as there was no need to remove shoes or finish your water, and the flight itself was uneventful. However, once we get our bags, we can’t find our guide. We keep looking around, but can’t find anyone that is holding a placard with our name on it. We attempt to call, but can’t really figure out the secret code for the country escape code and whether the area code is needed or not, and is it 2 digits or 3? Vicky takes another walk around and finds our driver – but our guide didn’t show up! The driver doesn’t speak much english, but gets us to our hotel in Miraflores.

After getting settled in, we walk over to the ChocoMuseo, or Chocolate Museum. We participate in a “Bean to Bar” chocolate workshop. They walk us through the history and process of making chocolate. Our instructor open up a pod and allowed us to take a bean. The beans are coated with a slimy goop when they are first taken out of the pod. We place the bean in our mouth and find that the goop is mildly sweet and rather tasty. We don’t eat the bean at this time.
Choco MuseoChoco Museo.
Choco MuseoChoco Museo.
Choco MuseoChoco Museo.
Choco MuseoChoco Museo.
Choco MuseoChoco Museo.

The beans are then fermented and dried. Once dried, the shell of the bean can easily be removed. We get dried beans and shuck them into a small bowl. The flaky shell may be used to make a tea. The tea is surprisingly good and mildly chocolate. The remaining part of the bean are the “nibs”. Using a good old fashioned mortar and pestle, we grind the nibs into a paste. The Incas made a spicy chocolate drink by adding chili pepper and mixing with hot water. We try this drink, but I am not impressed so I don’t finish it. It was the Spanish who first mixed it with hot milk and cinnamon to make a much better tasting hot chocolate drink in my opinion. The paste can also be mixed with some milk, melted, and then cooled on a stone slab to make a molten chocolate. Using some plastic molds and a wide variety of toppings, we made our very own combinations. After being refrigerated for a time, we were able to take our creations home with us to be enjoyed with a glass of red wine!
Choco MuseoChoco Museo.
Choco MuseoChoco Museo.
Choco MuseoChoco Museo.
Choco MuseoChoco Museo.
Choco MuseoChoco Museo.
Choco MuseoChoco Museo.
Choco MuseoChoco Museo.
Choco MuseoChoco Museo.
Choco MuseoChoco Museo.
Choco MuseoChoco Museo.
Choco MuseoChoco Museo.
Choco MuseoChoco Museo.

Later that afternoon, a guide picked us up to take a tour of the Barranco District which is Lima’s artsy area. There are many colonial style buildings; the flowers and lighting presents a very nice romantic atmosphere. We take a stop and walk across the Puente de los Suspiros, or Bridge of Sighs. It is said that young lovers from the two sides would meet here and thus the name of the bridge. After driving and walking around the area, our driver takes us to a dinner which includes a traditional dancing show. The dancers are dressed in a variety of Peruvian costumes and is very acrobatic and entertaining.
Choco MuseoBarranco District.
Traditional Dancing ShowTraditional Dancing Show.
Traditional Dancing ShowTraditional Dancing Show.

Here is a link to a video from the show. The video is about one and half minutes.
Traditional Dance – Video

Dinner BuffetDinner Buffet.

Categories: Peru 2017 Tags: ,
  1. No comments yet.
  1. No trackbacks yet.